Walks & Guides

Welcome to our guide to walks and trails in Bude, your gateway to exploring the stunning landscapes and natural wonders of this beautiful coastal destination.  Whether you’re a seasoned hiker, a nature enthusiast, or simply looking for a leisurely stroll, our curated selection of walks and trails caters to all interests and abilities.

From the rugged cliffs of the South West Coast Path to the tranquil woodlands and scenic beachfront promenades, Bude offers a diverse range of outdoor experiences waiting to be discovered.  Each walk is accompanied by route descriptions and difficulty levels, ensuring a memorable and enjoyable adventure for every visitor.

So lace up your walking shoes, grab your map, and embark on a journey of exploration and discovery through the breathtaking landscapes of Bude and its surrounding areas.

Duckpool and Coombe Valley
Circular walks Dog walks Drive for a walk Woodland walks

Duckpool and Coombe Valley

A captivating journey meandering through footpaths and woodland. Starting at Duckpool, the walk takes you inland and delves into the Coombe Valley and the enchanting woodlands of Stowe.

Crackington Haven and Strangles Secret Beach
Beach walks Circular walks Dog walks Drive for a walk SWCP

Crackington Haven and Strangles Secret Beach

A picturesque circular walk starting from Crackington Haven car park, offering varied landscapes, including stunning coastal views, tranquil valleys, a secret beach (Strangles) and charming countryside scenery.  This walk is perfect for nature enthusiasts and those seeking a peaceful coastal adventure.

To reach Crackington Haven, take the 95 bus from Bude.  Alternatively, its a 20-minute drive from Bude.

 

Bude Three Beaches
Beach walks Circular walks Dog walks SWCP

Bude Three Beaches

Explore three of Bude’s beaches, the Breakwater, the South West Coast Path and a shipwreck with this delightful and easy walk that unveils the natural beauty and coastal allure of Bude.

This scenic journey guides you from the Bude Canal Lock Gates, across Summerleaze Beach to Northcott Mouth, and back to Bude along the South West Coast Path.

You’ll experience the landscape from two perspectives – along the shore below the dramatic cliffs, and along the South West Coast Path looking down onto the beaches and across the distant headlands, as far as the eye can see.

Morwenstow to Marsland Mouth
Circular walks Dog walks Drive for a walk SWCP

Morwenstow to Marsland Mouth

This circular walk starts and finishes at the Rectory Farm Tea Rooms.  The route uses the South West Coast Path and inland footpaths and tracks.  You’ll be treated to a combination of breathtaking dramatic coastal cliff views, Lundy Island (on a clear day) and the quiet solitude of farmland, mostly unchanged since the building of the agrarian manor houses which dot the area.

Morwenstow to Stanbury Mouth
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Morwenstow to Stanbury Mouth

Embark on a picturesque circular journey traversing the renowned South West Coast Path and meandering through inland footpaths and tracks.  This route unveils a tapestry of scenic wonders and cultural gems, include the awe-inspiring Church of St. Morwenna, renowned for its exquisite Norman architecture, the iconic Hawker’s Hut steeped in maritime history, the enchanting Tidna Valley, and the secluded beauty of Stanbury Mouth’s clandestine beach.

Bude Canal and Coast Path Circular Walk
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Bude Canal and Coast Path Circular Walk

This historically rich walk is filled with varied scenery and panoramic views. The level path follows the Bude Canal, a remarkable relic of 19th century engineering, to its terminal as a barge waterway.  The wide open views from the fields of Whalesborough overlooking Widemouth Bay and the rugged cliffline to the south are without doubt, breath-taking, especially when the surf pounds the coast.  Then there are the clifftops with their dramatic, geological formations, leading you to views overlooking Bude, its bay, and beyond to Hartland and Exmoor.

Bude WWII Heritage Trail
Accessible walks Circular walks

Bude WWII Heritage Trail

This Bude WWII Heritage Trail is a guide around the town to some of the places used by the American troops who came here to train for the D-Day landings in 1944. When you come to each blue plaque you’ll find a QR code – scan these to hear stories of local people and narratives come to life!

Millook Haven to Dizzard Point
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Millook Haven to Dizzard Point

An inspirational journey through the ancient woodland of Dizzard Point, a testament to Bude’s rich natural history dating back to prehistoric times. Explore the depths of this historic forest, where rare lichens flourish in the pristine air, and meander through hay meadows adorned with a vibrant tapestry of wildflowers and butterflies.

Parking is limited at Millook, but it is possile to get the 95 bus to Widemouth Bay and walk to the start point.

Bude to Widemouth Bay
Circular walks Dog walks SWCP

Bude to Widemouth Bay

Crackington Haven to St Gennys
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Crackington Haven to St Gennys

Explore the stunning coastal scenery surrounding Crackington Haven on this energetic circular walk, offering panoramic views, charming hamlets, and a visit to the historic St. Gennys Church.

The Tamara Way
Linear walks

The Tamara Way

Introducing the Tamara Coast to Coast Way, a captivating 87-mile walking route that seamlessly connects the south and north coasts of Cornwall. Embark on a remarkable journey tracing the Tamar River from its origin in Plymouth to the rugged cliffs of Morwenstow, just north of Bude, where Cornwall meets Devon.

This well-marked trail offers a variety of experiences as it winds its way along the riverbanks, allowing walkers the option to traverse either the Cornish or Devonian sides at various points. Divided into seven manageable sections, each day’s walk offers its own unique charm, from expansive estuary views to tranquil ancient woodlands and meandering water-meadows steeped in Cornwall’s rich mining history.

Venture through lush farmland and follow the winding path of the historic Bude Canal before reaching the source of the Tamar River, where a newly erected marker stone awaits. The final stretch leads to the remote Marsland Mouth and its secluded beach, offering a picturesque end to your coastal journey.

Continuing along the South West Coast Path to Morwenstow, walkers are treated to breathtaking views of the Atlantic coast and the opportunity to explore Cornwall’s designated Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty and World Heritage landscapes. For avid hikers, extending the adventure along the South West Coast Path to Land’s End and completing the Circuit of Cornwall is a tempting option.

Accessible by public transport and featuring sections suitable for varying abilities, the Tamara Coast to Coast Way promises an unforgettable experience for all who venture along its path. Whether you’re seeking panoramic vistas, cultural heritage, or simply the joy of exploration, this new walking route delivers on every front.

Bude Canal & Marshes Circular
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Bude Canal & Marshes Circular

Bude Marshes is a countryside gem that reaches into the heart of Bude.  Situated alongside the canal and behind the Bude Tourist Information Centre, it attained recognition as a Local Nature Reserve in 1983, marking the first of its kind in Cornwall!  It offers an idyllic setting for a leisurely flat, traffic-free stroll on a tarmac surface amidst nature’s beauty.  Not only is it significant to Bude’s wildlife conservation efforts but it stands as a vital cornerstone of the Bude Flood Prevention Scheme.

Bude Marshes Nature Reserve is a haven for wildlife enthusiasts, offering a diverse array of flora and fauna.  Among the species commonly spotted in the reserve kingfishers, herons, geese and ducks, which frequent the wetland habitats.  You may also encounter small mammals like otters, voles and shrews, as well as amphibians like frogs and toads, particularly around the marshy areas.  In addition, the reserve supports a variety of plant life, including reeds, rushes, and sedges, as well as wildflowers that bloom throughout the seasons.

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